Environmental Health Division
Working to keep the environment safe for us all.
Emergency Preparedness Division
Protecting our citizens from public health emergencies - natural, biological, chemical, radiological and nuclear.
Health Education Division
Helping people to make healthier choices and live healthier lifestyles through education and instruction.
Nursing Division
Committed to Promoting Healthy Lifestyles
Human Services Division
Addressing the needs of our most at risk population with respect, care and accountability.

Salem County Department of Health & Human Services


Prevent. Promote. Protect.

measles

Our Mission

We are dedicated to the promotion and protection of the public’s health through prevention, education & partnership within the community of Salem County.

Our Vision

We will continually enhance and adapt our services to the needs of the community resulting in a healthy, accountable population that recognizes the Health Department as a valuable resource.  The 10 essential public health services.

  • Monitor health status to identify community health problems and community resources
  • Diagnose and investigate health problems and health hazards in the community
  • Inform, educate, and empower people about health issues
  • Mobilize community partnerships to identify and solve health problems
  • Develop policies and plans that support individual and community health efforts
  • Enforce laws and regulations that protect health and ensure safety
  • Link people to needed personal health services and assure the provision of health care when otherwise unavailable
  • Assure a competent public health and personal health care workforce
  • Evaluate effectiveness, accessibility, and quality of personal and population-based health services
  • Research for new insights and innovative solutions to health problems

hiv

Get the facts, get tested, and get involved to take care of yourself and your partners.

An estimated 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV, and that number grows by almost 50,000 every year. One in eight people who have HIV don’t know it. That means they aren’t getting the medical care they need to stay healthy and avoid passing HIV to others.

CDC has found that more than 90 percent of new HIV infections in the United States could be prevented by testing and diagnosing people who have HIV and ensuring they receive prompt, ongoing care and treatment. Early linkage to and retention in HIV care is central to managing HIV and promoting health among all people living with HIV. HIV medicines can keep people with HIV healthy for many years, and greatly reduce the chance of transmitting HIV to their sex partners.

Get the Facts

Protecting yourself and others against HIV starts with knowledge. Knowing the facts about HIV will help you make informed decisions about sex, drug use, and other activities that may put you and your partners at risk for HIV.

  • Learn the basics about HIV, how to prevent HIV transmission, and the steps you can take to protect yourself and others.
  • Talk about what you learn with your friends and other people who are important to you.
  • Empower even more people via social media. Share your new knowledge with your friends online.

Find more information about HIV testing, and who should be tested, on CDC’s HIV Testing Basics web page.

Get TestedPoster: June 27 is National HIV Testing Day. Get the facts. Get tested. Get involved. cdc.gov/together

The only way to know if you are infected with HIV is to get tested.

CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care, and that people with certain risk factors get tested more often. People with more than one sex partner, people with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and people who inject drugs are likely to be at high risk and should get tested at least once a year. Sexually active gay and bisexual men may benefit from even more frequent testing, depending on their risk. To protect your own health, you should also get tested if you have been sexually assaulted.

If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, CDC recommends HIV testing with each pregnancy, both for your own benefit and to reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to your baby.

See our Basic Testing Q&As for more information.

Knowing your HIV status gives you the power to control your health and your future. And getting tested has never been easier. You can ask your health care provider to test you for HIV. Many medical clinics, substance abuse programs, community health centers, and hospitals offer HIV testing. Testing is often free of charge. You can also

  • Visit GetTested and enter your ZIP code.
  • Text your ZIP code to KNOWIT (566948), and you will receive a text back with a testing site near you.
  • Call 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) to ask for free testing sites in your area.
  • Contact your local health department.
  • Get a home testing kit (the Home Access HIV-1 Test System or the OraQuick In-Home HIV Test) from a drugstore.

See our Basic Testing Q&As for more information.

Calendar of Events

SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1
2
3
Health Screenings 9:00 am
Health Screenings @ Pennsville Post Office
Aug 3 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol and Sugar screenings. You can find us at: Pennsville Post Office First Monday of every month Elmer Post Office Second Wednesday of every month
4
5
6
7
8
9
Health Screenings 9:00 am
Health Screenings @ Elmer Post Office
Aug 12 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Free Blood Pressure, Cholesterol and Sugar screenings. You can find us at: Pennsville Post Office First Monday of every month Elmer Post Office Second Wednesday of every month

Contact Us

Salem County Health Dept.
110 Fifth Street • Suite 400
Salem, NJ 08079

856.935.7510 (Phone)
856.935.8483 (Fax)
Report An Immediately Reportable Disease: 856-935-7510 ext. 8304

After Hours Contact

856.769.1955

Have Concerns?

Report a Public Health Concern Here

facebook

public-health

FIND US AT:  110 Fifth Street, Suite 400, Salem, NJ 08079